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This momentous week, beginning on the mighty 10th December, has now been dubbed Hobbit Week. On Thursday, December 13th, The Hobbit hits UK cinemas – and my ticket is already booked for 7pm and has been for about a fortnight. I already have plans to arrive there at LEAST half an hour early just to get a good seat… I refuse to watch the ground-breaking 48FPS with children kicking my chair or instead leaving the cinema with a permanent neck jarr.

Alas, I am no big time blogger. Therefore I cannot give you an early review and revel together… you’ll just have to wait for thursday with me.

Bilbo Baggins

Bilbo Baggins

But what I can (and will) do is do a nice review of the book! As, I am ashamed to admit, I finished it last night. Now, my mum did read it to me when I was a wee thing, but because I was a wee thing I don’t remember much (basically any) of it. My memory is truly awful with books as I’ve read far too many of them in my 20 years. I was determined to read it before the film, however, because that is always the best way to enjoy film adaptions, and I adore Lord of the Rings. Plus I never got that chance with LotR, so here is my turn!

The book, as most people have decided before me, is a right charm. It is a shiny gem in Gollum’s cave and as adoringly bumbling as Bilbo. Unlike books for kids such as Harry Potter, you are constantly reminded it is for children, but that is why it works so well.

The simplicity of it is where I believe the genius lies – it is quite literally there and back again. The random events along the way help to flesh it out and give the story some depth, but it is purely for story’s sake. It is a book full of chance encounters that give J.R.R Tolkien a chance to fascinate us with more people of his world.

Which is what gives the book its richness – its characters. Despite the dwarves blending into one entity (apart from Thorin Oakenshield) you love each and every one of them separately. Bilbo is such a good piece of characterisation, who epitomizes Hobbit’s and the less adventurous of us all. There is definitely something decidedly British about him as well. The way he becomes a name unto himself, especially after the chapter with Gollum, makes you root for him more and more. Gandalf is… well, Gandalf, which is all we need to say. Even driven Thorin melts your heart a little as the adventure goes on.

It’s like revisiting your favourite Disney films – clearly for children but that’s why you love it so much.

Although, for this reason I have become a teensy bit apprehensive towards the film. I know it is in perfectly good hands with Peter Jackson, but stretching it across one film (let alone a trilogy) will be interesting to see. Fitting in the extra folklore to tie it with the LotR is another thing I can’t wait to see how they tackle, as The Hobbit is far from a back-story tale. It just doesn’t need the extra information.

Adapting the storyline, the chance encounters and wonderfully random adventures, for the film screen is certainly something I am looking forward to seeing, plus whether they will include the more sinister side to the ring, and whether they pull it off only time will tell.

 

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